Sunday, March 13, 2011

A New Platen Makes A Happy Typewriter.

9 comments:

  1. Looking forward to those videos.

    I was just cleaning my own old Hermes 2000, removing gunk that had been there since I got it, and now that it works freely I really like the feel of it.

    New platens are a nice, happy feeling ...

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  2. Can't wait to see the videos. I love a new platen. I only have one typewriter with a new platen and it's pretty much my favorite for that reason.

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  3. I've yet to get a new platen on any of my typewriters. I've heard mixed reviews which makes me apprehensive to make any changes. At some point, I'm probably going to have to take the plunge!

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  4. I'm with Deek. No new platens for me. But for different reasons. One is I've got no clue how to remove a few of mine, and the second is I'm stingy with my money (since my birthday was just here, I'm temporarily not broke and back to being stingy.)

    Art

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  5. ...again, as deek, no new platens. Could be a cure for a Remington NP which makes only the lightest of impressions. Or maybe I'll just double up on the paper thickness and hope that works? Really looking forward to the video!

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  6. I've had only my Olympia re-rubberized, and it definitely made a big difference on that machine.
    Good rubber is hard to come by in the machines you find in the wild. It's almost the first thing I check on a machine I find - because even though it's not tough to replace, it does make a big difference and I like to know that I'm getting a machine that has likely been maintained.

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  7. Duffy, platen hardness usually has nothing to do with how well maintained the machine was. I've seen absolutely mint machines with fossilized platens, and it's mainly due to the conditions they were in, and simply the fact that rubber usually gets harder with age. But, it does have to do with maintenance to a degree... For example, my 1961 Royal FP has a like-new platen on it, while my 1966 Hermes Ambassador has a rock hard one that I have to use two sheets of paper with to type on it until I get it replaced, since Ames doesn't have the right size rubber anymore.

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  8. Other than changing a ribbon, replacing the platen is the cheapest upgrade you can make on your machine and gives the most dramatic results. If your machine has a rock hard platen, the keyes are bouncing off the paper an unable to make a proper embossment. That's why the tails of desending characters fade off or the top and bottoms of capital letters are so weak especially on pica type. A new platen has a little give to it so the keyes sink into the platen a tiny bit giving a deeper embossment, making the type look full and dark. If you type on a machine with a new ribbon, platen and use real typing paper, your letters will look heaven sent. The type just pops off the page.

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